Inclusiveness and Gender in Erinbour

I have been working on how to put this in words and get it right. I will try and I ask that anyone who reads this as offensive tell me so I can fix it and be better moving forward.

I decided about a month ago I waned to make sure Erinbour was Inclusive and began trying to figure out how to put it in the books. There was some help and I am greatful from them to help me write this about gender/sexuality in Erinbour.

“A character may define themselves as Male, Female, fluid, as either or neither male or female as they see the character at anytime for any reason. It is your character and you should play them as you feel the most comfortable.”

Sexuality/gender in Erinbour has no mechanical bearing and I want to stay as gender neutral as i can.  Again I know this is not perfect but I am asking from others especially in the Trans* and Intersex community to make sure I am getting this right from the begining.

One thought on “Inclusiveness and Gender in Erinbour”

  1. I will say that sentence reads as clunky to me and could be reworded for easier reading. It also starts with an assumption of female and male, which could be better. Addressing that a person’s anatomy might be considered female, intersex, male, or whatever else might be available in your setting, and that their identity or presentation may or may not be connected to their anatomy, could be a good start.

    Presentation or appearance is what most people will use to try and discern someone’s age, ethnicity, gender, socioeconomic status, or even religious or secular affiliations–there’s no really knowing these things without asking, only guesses (which may or may not be education, and even if educated could as easily be wrong). It may be worthwhile not only to address these ideas in text but also include options for listing appearance and presentation (which could include wardrobe, makeup, transportation mode, entourage, and even gait, speed or style of movement).

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